Preventing the summer slide at Jere Baxter

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Those who visit Jere Baxter Middle School on a summer day will find a full parking lot and a hustle-and-bustle similar to a regular school day. The school is one of many host locations across the district for MNPS summer camps and programs. Jere Baxter alone holds three different camps inside—a Teach for America Program, an English Learner (EL) camp and a Discovery STEAM camp.

Each morning all students at the location take time to eat free breakfast together in the cafeteria. Students who live in the cluster are also provided free transportation to and from the location— an important option for families. From there, students go into a block schedule similar to a regular school day. In the EL camps, students spend time in English, lunch and math. The participating students speak six different languages but they all share the common goal of learning a new language together.

“I had a student who had become afraid of coming to school, after summer school that all changed,” said Hannah Rice, EL teacher and camp leader. “Not only did the smaller class size and more personal one-on-one time help, it also made these students more comfortable because of their shared experiences.”

Along with social gains, participants are tested at the beginning of camp and at the end to measure specific academic growth. Last year Rice said the Text Level Assessment (TLA) growth was significant and they expect the same this year. Even when students test similarly at the end of the program, they are maintaining levels of improvement and are provided a chance to practice English in a more relaxed atmosphere.

MNPS partner, Teach for America (TFA), is working with elementary and middle school students in credit recovery, remediation and academic enrichment in a similar personalized learning environment.

“It is amazing to see kids getting those levels of individual support—you see a lot of joy in these classrooms,” said Megan Lemming, managing director for pre-service training at Teach for America.

The TFA program also provides pre- and post-tests which showed two months of reading growth in the four weeks of instruction last year. The elementary and middle curriculum is heavily literacy and math-focused with differentiated reading groups, a process through which teachers enhance learning by matching student characteristics to instruction and assessment and through guided reading. At the high school level, 95 percent of students received credit recovery—enabling students to recover course credits lost during the school year to get back on track for grade–level advancement or graduation. TFA and the EL camp both expect similarly impressive results this year.

No matter the subject or purpose of MNPS summer programs and camps, the goal is to help keep students engaged and prevent summer learning loss. In addition, summer programs keep students fed and away from other potentially harmful activities when presented with idle time.